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Engineering Consultants Market Report - Focus on Sector Capability & Strategy - UK 2011-2015 Analysis

Published: 30/11/2011 / Number of Pages: 90 / Price: £795.00 £495.00

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Introduction and Overview

AMA Research are pleased to announce the publication of the 1st Edition of a new report on the UK Building and Construction Consultants Market, entitled - "Engineering Consultants Market Report - Focus on Sector Capability and Strategy - UK 2011-2015 Analysis". The report should be of particular interest to clients and supply chain members including manufacturers, consulting engineers, architects & designers, contractors, suppliers, and construction professionals, providing a comprehensive review of the engineering consultancy market.

Key areas in the report:

  • Structure and size of the UK engineering consultancy sector.
  • Analysis of key market sectors within the consulting industry.
  • Analysis of the key market strengths/experience of the top 20 Tier 1 and top 20 Tier 2 consultants, Top 20 Architects and Top 20 Quantity Surveyors operating in the UK.
  • Analysis of the performance of the consulting industry including structure, size, market segmentation and market strengths.
  • Key market trends and the impact of the economic downturn on consultants' focus and sector strategy.
  • Market forecast for the Building and Construction Industry over the next few years.

With competition for construction work now stronger than ever, consultants are chasing growth prospects in other sectors such as environmental and energy, driven by developments in low carbon and growth in the renewables market. As market growth is driven by the evolving climate change agenda and the shift to a low carbon economy we discuss key consultants' activity in this sector.

Areas of particular interest include:

  • A detailed review of leading consultants and their consortia in 10 key market sectors including healthcare and education - covering review of the sector, key consultants within, their main experience and consortia membership.
  • Key market trends and the impact of government spending cuts on sector projects and capital programmes.
  • Analysis of change and diversification within the consulting industry as firms address the impact of the downturn on workloads and order books.
  • Analysis of the performance of construction output over the past five years for 10 leading non-domestic market sectors and forecasts to 2015.

Some of the Companies Included:

Aecom, Arup, Atkins, BDP, Capita Symonds, CH2M Hill, Halcrow, Hyder, Jacobs, Mott MacDonald Group, Mouchel, Parsons Brinckerhoff, Turner & Townsend, URS Scott Wilson, WSP Group, WYG,DP, Aedas, Devereux Architects, EPR Architects, Foster + Partners, Grimshaw Architects, HLM Architects, Pascall & Watson, Penoyre & Prasad, PRP, Stanton Williams, Wilkinson Eyre Architects.

Consultants Review by Sector

  • Structure of the UK Engineering Consultancy Industry.
  • Change and diversification within the consulting industry.
  • Overview and consultants' strengths.
  • Consortia in the consulting industry.
  • End use sector analysis - consultants' capability by sector.
  • The performance of leading consultants is reviewed over the past five years, through 10 non-domestic market sectors together with forecasts for construction activity over the next few years.
  • The report reviews the continued expansion of many consultants into overseas markets, as UK workloads fall, by tapping into high growth markets such as Asia and covers the recent increase in takeover activity of UK consultants by larger overseas firms. Both Scott Wilson and Davis Langdon were acquired by large American engineers URS and Aecom respectively in 2010.

UK Construction Market/Contractors' Output

  • Total Construction Output - value of output: Construction new work
  • Construction output in 2011 and beyond
  • Construction output by sector, including the following data:
  • Value from 2008, with forecasts to 2015.
  • Key points and trends.
  • Key capital commitments and building programmes.
  • This information presented for the following key non-domestic sectors:
  • Education, University, Healthcare, Transport, Defence, Utilities, Industrial/Retail warehousing, Commercial Office, Retail, Hotel/Leisure.

The Economic Environment in the UK

  • GDP, Sterling, Inflation and Interest Rates
  • Employment Rates in the UK
  • Household Consumption
  • Housing & Construction
  • UK Population Profile

Report Summary

The consulting industry has been undergoing a period of considerable change in response to the current economic downturn and has identified the need diversify as a result. Since the first indications of the credit crunch in 2007, firms have had to reshape their businesses to cope as the UK moved from growth into recession.

Not every sector has been affected in the same way. Consultants with a significant proportion of workload tied into framework agreements will be partially insulated from the downturn in the construction industry, at least until these frameworks are due for renewal.

The cumulative impact of public sector cuts on the UK consulting and engineering sector is expected to be considerable. Larger consultants' reliance on big government-sponsored projects has now made them more vulnerable as public spending cuts begin to take effect. However, relying on the private sector in the short-term to balance the drop off in public sector work will also be unrealistic for many consultants. Having taken measures in the past two years to adjust their cost and workforce structures, consultants are now focusing their attention on their target markets. The fact that energy and nuclear projects are likely to go ahead with private funding is good for those firms with expertise in these sectors and will help to balance the inevitable fall off in health and education sector output.

A number of consultants involved in public sectors are now looking to diversify and focus on strategies to balance the types of public sector work currently undertaken. EC Harris, for example, has stated its intention to position itself as a strategic 'built asset consultancy' rather than simply a QS and project manager - traditional areas, which have been under pressure. As such, the firm is looking to enter higher value areas of consultancy.

With the UK government planning to spend less, consultants are also increasingly looking at overseas markets and diversifying away from their reliance on UK construction, in favour of international operations. Many large consultants are attempting to retain their position in the global marketplace by achieving operations on a global scale and tapping into high growth markets such as Asia. A global outlook is thought to be essential for the future of the consulting profession over the short term as consultancies purely dependent on UK work continue to struggle.

Two years ago, consultancies faced weakening demand from their private sector clients, while public sector demand remained buoyant. Now the balance has shifted. A partial private sector recovery is under way, but the public sector spending squeeze is already affecting the sector. For consultancies dependent on government and council clients, the impact of the cuts are of considerable concern. However, there still remain growth possibilities for consultants with the rebalancing of the public and private sectors giving rise to the outsourcing of many services in the public sector to the private sector.

There are also growth prospects for consultants in environmental and energy sectors, driven by developments in low carbon and growth in energy from waste, anaerobic digestion, biogas and renewable sources of energy. Market growth is expected to be driven by the evolving climate change agenda, the shift to a low carbon economy and the development of associated legislation. The coalition government has set out a programme for energy and environmental issues and there is also a continued aim to do more on waste and sustainability, with pressure for ongoing investment in waste and recycling infrastructure. As a result, many councils look towards more private sector involvement in expanding and improving their waste services.

Consultancy work in infrastructure planning is also expected to stay relatively buoyant driven by continued infrastructure development and work related to the 2012 Olympics, urban transport projects and the development of high-speed rail.


List of Report Contents

  1. Contents Listing
  2. 1. INTRODUCTION 6
  3. 1.1 BACKGROUND 6
  4. 1.2 SOURCES OF INFORMATION 7
  5. 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND FUTURE PROSPECTS 8
  6. 3. ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT 12
  7. 3.1 GDP 12
  8. 3.2 INFLATION & INTEREST RATES 13
  9. 3.3 UNEMPLOYMENT 14
  10. 3.4 HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION 15
  11. 3.5 HOUSING & CONSTRUCTION 16
  12. 3.6 STERLING 17
  13. 3.7 POPULATION PROFILE 18
  14. 3.8 CONCLUSIONS 19
  15. 4. UK CONSTRUCTION MARKET OVERVIEW 21
  16. 4.1 TOTAL CONSTRUCTION OUTPUT 21
  17. 4.1.1 Value of Output - Construction New Work (Non-Domestic) 21
  18. 4.2 CONSTRUCTION OUTPUT IN 2011 AND BEYOND 22
  19. 4.3 CONSTRUCTION OUTPUT BY SECTOR 23
  20. 4.3.1 Education Construction Output - Key Summary Data 25
  21. 4.3.2 University Construction Output - Key Summary Data 25
  22. 4.3.3 Healthcare Construction Output - Key Summary Data 26
  23. 4.3.4 Transport Construction Output - Key Summary Data 27
  24. 4.3.5 Defence Construction Output - Key Summary Data 28
  25. 4.3.6 Utilities Construction Output - Key Summary Data 28
  26. 4.3.7 Industrial Warehousing Construction Output - Key Summary Data 29
  27. 4.3.8 Commercial Office Construction Output - Key Summary Data 30
  28. 4.3.9 Retail Construction Output - Key Summary Data 31
  29. 4.3.10 Hotel & Leisure Construction Output - Key Summary Data 32
  30. 5. CONSULTANTS REVIEW BY SECTOR 34
  31. 5.1 STRUCTURE AND VALUE OF THE CONSULTANTS' MARKET 34
  32. 5.2 CHANGE AND DIVERSIFICATION WITHIN THE CONSULTING INDUSTRY 34
  33. 5.3 OVERVIEW AND CONSULTANT STRENGTHS 37
  34. 5.4 ARCHITECTS 40
  35. 5.5 SURVEYORS 42
  36. 5.6 CONSORTIA 44
  37. 5.7 END USE SECTOR ANALYSIS 46
  38. 5.7.1 Schools 46
  39. 5.7.2 Universities 49
  40. 5.7.3 Healthcare 52
  41. 5.7.4 Transport 56
  42. 5.7.5 Defence 61
  43. 5.7.6 Utilities 64
  44. 5.7.7 Industrial & Warehousing 66
  45. 5.7.8 Commercial Office 68
  46. 5.7.9 Retail Sector 70
  47. 5.7.10 Leisure Sector 72
  48. 6. CONSULTANTS PROFILES 74
  49. 6.1 MAJOR CONSULTING ENGINEERS - KEY PROFILES 74
  50. 6.1.1 Aecom 74
  51. 6.1.2 Arup 74
  52. 6.1.3 Atkins 75
  53. 6.1.4 BDP 76
  54. 6.1.5 Capita Symonds 77
  55. 6.1.6 Halcrow 78
  56. 6.1.7 Hyder 78
  57. 6.1.8 Jacobs 79
  58. 6.1.9 Mott MacDonald 79
  59. 6.1.10 Mouchel 80
  60. 6.1.11 Parsons Brinckerhoff 81
  61. 6.1.12 Turner & Townsend 82
  62. 6.1.13 URS Scott Wilson 83
  63. 6.1.14 WSP 83
  64. 6.1.15 WYG 84
  65. 6.2 MAJOR ARCHITECTS - KEY PROFILES 84
  1. Tables & Charts
  2. TABLE 1 TOP CONSULTANTS BY SECTOR STRENGTH 9
  3. CHART 2 INTEREST RATES AND INFLATION (CPI) FROM 1992-2015 14
  4. CHART 3 PDI & SAVINGS RATIO AT CURRENT PRICES 1992-2015 16
  5. TABLE 4 EXCHANGE RATE FLUCTUATIONS 2006-2011 - STERLING TO THE DOLLAR, AND THE EURO, SPOT RATES 18
  6. CHART 5 AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE RESIDENT UK POPULATION MID-2008 ('000) 18
  7. CHART 6 NON-DOMESTIC CONSTRUCTION OUTPUT (UK) 2005 TO 2015 - BY VALUE (£ BN AT CURRENT PRICES) 21
  8. TABLE 7 NON-DOMESTIC CONSTRUCTION OUTPUT BY SECTOR 2008 TO 2015 - BY VALUE (£ BILLION CURRENT PRICES) 24
  9. TABLE 8 TOP 20 UK TIER 1 CONSULTANTS BY REVENUE (£M) AND SECTOR STRENGTHS 38
  10. TABLE 9 TOP 20 UK TIER 2 CONSULTANTS BY REVENUE (£M) AND SECTOR STRENGTHS 39
  11. TABLE 10 TOP 20 UK ARCHITECTS BY UK FEES (£M) AND SECTOR STRENGTHS 41
  12. TABLE 11 TOP 20 UK SURVEYORS BY UK FEES (£M) AND SECTOR STRENGTHS 43
  13. TABLE 12 LEADING CONSULTANTS AND PRINCIPAL PFI/FRAMEWORK CONSORTIA 45
  14. TABLE 13 SCHOOLS SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS BY PROJECT EXPERIENCE 48
  15. TABLE 14 UNIVERSITIES SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS - PROJECT EXPERIENCE 51
  16. TABLE 15 HEALTH SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS - PROJECT EXPERIENCE 54
  17. TABLE 16 TRANSPORT SECTOR ANALYSIS (ROAD, RAIL, AIRPORTS, PORTS) - TOP CONSULTANTS BY VALUE OF PROJECTS (£M) 2010 59
  18. TABLE 17 DEFENCE SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS BY VALUE OF PROJECTS (£M) 2010 63
  19. TABLE 18 AMP WATER FRAMEWORKS 2010-15 - UTILITY COMPANY AND FRAMEWORK CONSULTANTS 64
  20. TABLE 19 UTILITIES SECTOR ANALYSIS (TELECOMS, WATER, ENERGY) - TOP CONSULTANTS BY VALUE OF PROJECTS (£M) 2010 65
  21. TABLE 20 INDUSTRIAL SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS BY VALUE OF PROJECTS (£M) 2010 67
  22. TABLE 21 COMMERCIAL OFFICE SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS - PROJECT EXPERIENCE 69
  23. TABLE 22 RETAIL SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS - PROJECT EXPERIENCE 71
  24. TABLE 23 HOTEL & LEISURE SECTOR ANALYSIS - TOP CONSULTANTS - PROJECT EXPERIENCE 73

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